Coherence, logic, cohesiveness: these are the characteristic of the story that suspends disbelief.

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Photo by Daniel Tafjord on Unsplash

The suspension of disbelief is the readers’ willingness to accept as credible facts and characters they would ordinarily consider incredible.

The suspension of disbelief is an essential part of modern storytelling.
Modern readers know that stories are not facts. They know that events and characters aren’t real, even when they look like they are. Yet readers accept them as real for the duration so to be able to enjoy the story.

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Coherence, logic, cohesiveness: these are the characteristic of the story that suspends disbelief.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Daniel Tafjord on Unsplash

The suspension of disbelief is the readers’ willingness to accept as credible facts and characters they would ordinarily consider incredible.

The suspension of disbelief is an essential part of modern storytelling.
Modern readers know that stories are not facts. They know that events and characters aren’t real, even when they look like they are. Yet readers accept them as real for the duration so to be able to enjoy the story.

British author and literary critic Samuel T. Coleridge was the first to call this attitude suspension of disbelief in 1817. The concept was of special importance for a Romantic like him because Romantic authors wrote stories that not only weren’t real, but they also didn’t look like they were. Fantastical elements were included in these stories, and even if readers knew these didn’t exist in the real world, they were still willing to pretend they could and read the story in the same way they did a perfectly realistic story. …


Hi everyone!
I hope you started the year with the right foot, as we say here in Italy. I — would say I have. Though anything would be better than the last couple of months, which were a total mess, especially at my day job.
But let’s not talk about the past.

After two months of almost total silent here on Medium, I published three articles about Tolkien in the last week. This is bound to be a good omen, or is it?

Tolkien Monthly — January 2021

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Photo by freestocks on Unsplash

One is my usual Tolkien Monthly. It’s especially divers this month, and I like it this way.

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Loss and sadness are at the heart of all of Tolkien’s stories of Middle-earth. From the very beginning of time.

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Photo by Norris Niman on Unsplash

There was Eru, the One, who in Arda is called Ilúvatar; and he made first the Ainur, the Holy Ones, that were the offspring of his thought, and they were with him before aught else was made. And he spoke to them, propounding to them themes of music; and they sang before him, and he was glad. But for a long while they sang only each alone, or but few together, while the rest hearkened; for each comprehended only that part of the mind of Ilúvatar from which he came, and in the understanding of their brethren they grew but slowly. …


Tolkien’s work is deeply about Hope, and still, it is seldom consolatory. He tells us about Hope as a powerful feeling, but it is so only if we act upon it.

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Photo by Martin Jernberg on Unsplash

Happy Birthday, Prof Tolkien!

Today it’s JRR Tolkien’s 129th birthday. What a beautiful age!

I’ve been on a journey with Tolkien for three years now. I’ve read pages from his work almost every day, but never like this year it gave comfort.

Tolkien’s work is deeply about Hope, and still, it is seldom consolatory. He tells us about Hope as a powerful feeling, but it is so only if we act upon it. ‘Hoping’ isn’t a passive experience in Tolkien’s stories. People hope, therefore they act.
Tolkien’s activism is one of the themes I love the most about his stories. Doesn’t matter what happens to you, doesn’t matter what kind of odds are against you, doesn’t matter how dire the situation — doesn’t matter how powerless you feel, the possibility of acting is always available, by choosing. …


Hope is a core theme in all of Tolkien’s stories. But it’s even more than is may seem at first.

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Photo by freestocks on Unsplash

And so, here we are — the first Tolkien Monthly of this new year.
I don’t remember when I started posting Tolkien Monthlies on my publication, but I don’t think it’s a year already. Though it must be close.

I hope to find you healthy and ready to face a year that, though it won’t be easy, I so very much hope it won’t be as though as 2020.

I don’t know about you, but Tolkien’s work had given me a lot of comfort throughout last year. He never offers consolation. But he does seek a sense to what happens, or rather I should say that he chooses to see sense even in the most terrible things. And he always — always invites us to take action, not to suffer what comes our way passively, but to make choices that will prompt action.
This is the greatest consolation of all that Tolkien gives me: we may choose to be victim, but we may also choose to be actors. …


Where there’s an ending, there’s a beginning. This may be the core of Tolkien’s message, and I think it is particularly pregnant for us this year.

We stand here, in the last month of this 2020, the most unexpected of years, and truly we may hope for a new beginning.

I started the year by rereading The Lord of the Rings and I’ll be ending the year by reading The Lord of the Rings. It happened by chance, but in a way, I’m happy it is so. Tolkien gave me a lot this year, far more than ever. Far, far more than I ever thought possible. …


Where there’s an ending, there’s a beginning.

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Photo by Sven Piek on Unsplash

The last month of this year. Can you believe it?

This was certainly the most unexpected of years, and I hope you’ve journeyed safely so far. We still have long winter months before us, but I hope we’ll make it.

I started the year reading The Lord of the Rings with my usual Tolkien reading group. The first time in English. It was such a fantastic experience. Tolkien was a wizard with words, and there’s no translation that can reproduce his love and knowledge of them. I discovered so many things I didn’t even imagine.

I was in lockdown when I read the Siege of Minas Tirith. Boy, was that an experience in itself! That sense of being enclosed, with a terrible danger outside, the sense of waiting and waiting while nothing happens. And all the while I thought that Tolkien experienced the same thing too, in the trenches of WWI, so long ago. I don’t think I’ll ever read that part of story in the same way after that read during lockdown. …


Hi there!
I feel like I disappeared from Medium and from this publication for such a long time. I know it isn’t that long, and besides, I’ve been exceptionally busy on the Tolkien front, lately. It seems a shame that it looks like I’m neglecting him here.

I’m quite busy with a new project with an Italian bibliotherapist who’s interested in creating courses of bibliotherapy centred on Tolkien and his work, and I’m helping him. It’s a project I’m very excited about, and although it is in Italian, I hope to be able to translate at least some of the material here. …


A new fan film, music and reflection inspired by Tolkien

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Photo by Joseph Barrientos on Unsplash

I have to admit it, October was an intensely Tolkien month for me. I enjoyed it immensely.
I’ve been involved in a bibliotherapy project about Tolkien, which is something I’m psych about. And with a friend, I’ve been watching hours of talks about Tolkien from both Oxonmoot and Middlemoot. I’m shocked at how many good speeches I’ve listened to.
I shouldn’t be surprised at how much life and insight there is in Tolkien’s work — but I continuously am.

Grace Under Pressure: The Rise of Númenor

by Jeff LaSala

Nice and easy to read the account of the Second Age, with many integrations to the Akallabeth from different writings by Tolkien.
Jeff LaSala writes in a very approachable way. It’s a pleasure to read his account of such complex events recounted in a very reader-friendly way. He makes it easy for any reader, even the ones who are new to Middle-earth, to step into this world without diminishing the grandeur of the Second Age. …

About

JazzFeathers

Author of historical fantasy novels set in the 1920s | Dieselpunk | 1920s social history blogger | Hopeless Tolkien nerd https://theoldshelter.com/

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