On Tolkien Reading Day, I want to share some of my favourite quotes from Tolkien’s universe.

Do you have any favourite quotes?

KEEP READING


Hope and Courage, two of Tolkine’s more powerful themes.

On Tolkien Reading Day, I want to share some of my favourite quotes from Tolkien’s universe with you.
Do you have any favourite quotes?


Keep an open mind. Listen to your reader. Don’t be afraid to change course

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When I created my blog on 8 March 2014, I didn’t feel particularly confident about it.

I had contemplated creating a blog many times because I read many, and I loved it. And yet — my own blog? What would I possibly write on my blog? I don’t have an exciting life and don’t have special insights to give to people. I thought I simply didn’t have anything to say, and if I had started my blog, it would have died in a few months. …


Let’s prepare for Tolkien Reading Day on 25 March!

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March is always a special month for us Tolkienites. On 25th March, the One Ring was destroyed and on that day, we celebrate Tolkien Reading Day.
What are you planning to do?
I will go on a quote spree, as I’ve done for the past couple of years. I haven’t decided on my theme yet, but I’d like to have one. Last year, I loved my theme about Sam.

This year’s Tolkien Reading Day will be particularly special for me because the course I’m part of — Il mondo nascosto di Tolkien — will launch on 25th March. This is…


Tolkien’s complexity is never disheartening and alwasy fascinating.

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I’m so sorry I’ve basically disappeared from the publication, but the truth is I’m working at a Tolkien project with an Italian bibliotherapist. He asked me to prepare a course for his Accademia Online di Biblioterapia, with the launch set for 25th March (you guessed it!).

I was delighted to receive the offer, but I never imagined what kind of commitment it would be. I’m enjoying it, immensely, mind you! But it is eating up at all my availability of writing time.

Anyway! At least, I will share some interesting articles and video I came upon last month.

The Danger of Canonizing Tolkien

by Dr…


Coherence, logic, cohesiveness: these are the characteristic of the story that suspends disbelief.

Photo by Daniel Tafjord on Unsplash

The suspension of disbelief is the readers’ willingness to accept as credible facts and characters they would ordinarily consider incredible.

The suspension of disbelief is an essential part of modern storytelling.
Modern readers know that stories are not facts. They know that events and characters aren’t real, even when they look like they are. Yet readers accept them as real for the duration so to be able to enjoy the story.

KEEP READING


Coherence, logic, cohesiveness: these are the characteristic of the story that suspends disbelief.

Photo by Daniel Tafjord on Unsplash

The suspension of disbelief is the readers’ willingness to accept as credible facts and characters they would ordinarily consider incredible.

The suspension of disbelief is an essential part of modern storytelling.
Modern readers know that stories are not facts. They know that events and characters aren’t real, even when they look like they are. Yet readers accept them as real for the duration so to be able to enjoy the story.

British author and literary critic Samuel T. Coleridge was the first to call this attitude suspension of disbelief in 1817. The concept was of special importance for a Romantic…


Hi everyone!
I hope you started the year with the right foot, as we say here in Italy. I — would say I have. Though anything would be better than the last couple of months, which were a total mess, especially at my day job.
But let’s not talk about the past.

After two months of almost total silent here on Medium, I published three articles about Tolkien in the last week. This is bound to be a good omen, or is it?

Tolkien Monthly — January 2021

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One is my usual Tolkien Monthly. It’s especially divers this month, and I like it this way.


Loss and sadness are at the heart of all of Tolkien’s stories of Middle-earth. From the very beginning of time.

Photo by Norris Niman on Unsplash

There was Eru, the One, who in Arda is called Ilúvatar; and he made first the Ainur, the Holy Ones, that were the offspring of his thought, and they were with him before aught else was made. And he spoke to them, propounding to them themes of music; and they sang before him, and he was glad. But for a long while they sang only each alone, or but few together, while the rest hearkened; for each comprehended only that part of the mind of Ilúvatar from which he came, and in the understanding of their brethren they grew but…


Tolkien’s work is deeply about Hope, and still, it is seldom consolatory. He tells us about Hope as a powerful feeling, but it is so only if we act upon it.

Photo by Martin Jernberg on Unsplash

Happy Birthday, Prof Tolkien!

Today it’s JRR Tolkien’s 129th birthday. What a beautiful age!

I’ve been on a journey with Tolkien for three years now. I’ve read pages from his work almost every day, but never like this year it gave comfort.

Tolkien’s work is deeply about Hope, and still, it is seldom consolatory. He tells us about Hope as a powerful feeling, but it is so only if we act upon it. ‘Hoping’ isn’t a passive experience in Tolkien’s stories. People hope, therefore they act. Tolkien’s activism is one of the themes I love the most about his stories. Doesn’t matter what happens…

JazzFeathers

Author of historical fantasy novels set in the 1920s | Dieselpunk | 1920s social history blogger | Hopeless Tolkien nerd https://theoldshelter.com/

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